Students and Graduates2019-09-01T18:00:30+00:00

Olha Bosak

“Development of intellectual capacity, exploring your hidden talents, building personality with a strong moral values system. That is what an UCU education is all about. Women may benefit the most from it; not only as future professionals in the humanities but also as future wives and mothers.”

Director of the International Projects Department,

National Academy of Public Administration, Office of the President of Ukraine

Sr. Romana Musenko

Overseeing the repair of a large building, taking care of orphan children, and maintaining a monastic prayer life is not always easy (!). However, Sr. Romana, a nun of the Order of St. Joseph, does her best. Her order assigned her to take in a number of orphans in Potelych, near the Polish border, and this has included fundraising to renovate a structure donated by the Ukrainian government and coordinating the repair work.

Consequently, Sr. Romana is most grateful for the training she is receiving at UCU’s Institute of Leadership and Management. “We are so glad finally to be taking courses in the management of non-profit organizations,” said Sr. Romana.

Bozhena Zakaliuzhna

Project manager at the Centre for Cultural Management, Lviv, Ukraine

“For me the Ukrainian Catholic University was the ideal place to test myself out: all the conditions are here to discover your talents and realize your possibilities. It’s a very unique laboratory in which to ‘know thyself.’ But, above all, the university is people who accept you, who are close by and don’t walk away in difficult times. There is a certainty that remains for the future that you can be yourself everywhere.”

Roman Zaviyskyy

A 1999 graduate, Zaviyskyy now teaches at UCU and in July 2011 became the first Ukrainian citizen to defend a doctorate in theology at Oxford University.

The advisor for Zaviyskyy’s dissertation was Prof. George Pattison of Oxford and the independent reader was the archbishop of Canterbury, Dr. Rowan Williams. The defense of the dissertation was held in Lambeth Palace, the official London residence of the head of the Church of England.

Zaviyskyy was born and grew up in Lviv, where he earned an engineering degree. After graduating from the Lviv Theological Academy (now UCU) in 1999, Zaviyskyy earned a master’s degree and licentiate at the Catholic University of Leuven (formerly known as Louvain) in Belgium. He then taught theology at UCU and in 2005 started doctoral studies at Oxford. He also taught at UCU’s branch in London.

Igor Telishevskyi

Consultant-assistant to national deputy in Ukraine’s Parliament

He graduated from UCU’s Faculty of Philosophy and Theology in 2008 and then entered the National Academy of Management, Law Faculty. From 2008 to 2009 he participated in the program “Assistant to the Head of a Committee of Ukraine’s Parliament.” Since 2009 he has been a consultant-assistant to a national deputy in Parliament.

“First of all, the Ukrainian Catholic University formed my personality and taught me what values should guide a person’s life. After I graduated from UCU, I found myself in a radically different environment. But I can say with certainty that the knowledge and spiritual formation from the university gave me the opportunity to move forward with certainty.

“After more education and a few years of work, I made a very important conclusion: the main thing in life is not ‘who’ you are but ‘what’ you are. The kind of people that the Ukrainian Catholic University ‘forges’ are precisely the kind of people necessary to build Ukraine.”

Vasil Stefaniv

Graduate who returned to teach at UCU

“Small universities are better because the students get more attention. Now as a teacher, I understand that this is also a benefit for the teacher.

“If you study at UCU, in five years you’ll become a professional in the area you choose. You’ll only be able to appreciate all the benefits of the university a few years after you finish.

“But when you’re working, you’ll understand and appreciate the choice you made as you work with your colleagues.”

Vasil Stefaniv was one of the first history students to graduate from the Ukrainian Catholic University, in 2007. He then went for a graduate degree at Lviv Polytechnic. He is now working on his dissertation and also teaching at UCU.

“Because of my situation, I wasn’t able to pay for tuition, but I was a good student, so I received a scholarship. I also worked in the library. Many of my peers worked in various areas of the university, for example, at the summer school. Finances were not a problem.

“I was able to study foreign languages very well at UCU. In our first year, we had English classes every day. It was difficult, but in a year we were already able to communicate fluently and read in English. We also had a Polish course. A fairly good grounding in Latin and Greek is important for those who want to be professionals in history, and also for theologians,” said Stefaniv.